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Battleship design 1890 - 1914

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HMS Tiger 1913

HMS Tiger was the only ship of its class, a sister ship, Leopard, was planned but never built. Tiger was an improvement on the battlecruiser design and at 29 knots and 704 foot was the largest and fastest ship afloat at the time.

HMS Tiger in action at the Battle of Jutland 1916. (RNM)
HMS Tiger in action at the Battle of Jutland 1916. (RNM)

Designers were going to base HMS Tiger on the Lion class battlecruiser. Shipbuilders modified it, however, following the new and more balanced design of the Japanese battlecruiser Kongo under construction at Vickers shipbuilders at the time.

Postcard of HMS Lion with an inset of Admiral David Beatty. HMS Tiger was intended to be the sister ship to HMS Lion. (RNM)
Postcard of HMS Lion with an inset of Admiral David Beatty. HMS Tiger was intended to be the sister ship to HMS Lion. (RNM)

The end result was a ship that weighed 28 430 tons and had a complement of 1121 men.

The Royal Navy installed 13.5-inch guns with a better arrangement of the wing turrets to allow a better arc of fire. They also increased the ship’s secondary armament from 4-inch guns to 6-inch guns, matching the newest British battleships of the time.

Unfortunately for the battlecruisers, the lightly armoured ships were vulnerable against similar ships with large calibre guns as witnessed at the Battle of Jutland in 1916.

HMS Tiger survived the battle, its distant relative, HMS Invincible, however, did not.

Last of HMS Invincible - only six survived. The Invincible was sunk with all but six of her crew perishing, including notable naval figure Admiral Horace Hood. (RNM)
Last of HMS Invincible - only six survived. (RNM)



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